Canular n°21 - 3 - Pièces de Plaute

Niveau : difficile

Retrouvez les véritables titres des pièces de Plaute. Attention aux pièges tendus par notre farceur de service !



L'Amphi triomphe
La Comédie des mânes
L'Arthrite à l'annulaire
Les Baksheeshs
Les Califes
Elastina ou l'étireur de corps
La Cafèt'
Le Paramythe
"Et pis" dit Guss
Les Mémères
Le Charmant
Le Seul Dard fanfaron
La Psalmodie de Brantôme
L'Oeil perçant
Le Petit Cartable grivois
Le Pasteur
Le Corsage
Minus
Les Trois Ecumes
Le Futal


Réponses ci-dessous. Answers below.

Canular n°21 - 3 - Pièces de Plaute
Amphitryon
La Comédie des ânes
La Marmite ou l'Aululaire
Les Bacchides
Les Captifs
Casina ou les Tireurs de sort
La Cassette
Le Parasite
Epidicus
Les Ménechmes
Le Marchand
Le Soldat fanfaron
La Comédie du fantôme (Le Revenant)
Le Persan
Le Petit Carthaginois
L'Imposteur
Le Cordage
Stichus
Les Trois Ecus
Le Brutal




Sabine Chaouche
04/27/2017

European Drama and Performance Studies - list of publications

Published:
N°1 - Le Développement du "grand spectacle" en France: Politiques, gestions, innovations. 1715-1864 - 2013 - 1
N°2 - L'Eloquence du silence. Dramaturgie du non-dit sur la scène théâtrale des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles - 2014 - 1
N°3 - Le document iconographique dans son contexte : le hors-champ des images du spectacle - 2014 - 2
N°4 - Dance and the Dutch Republic - 2015 - 1
N°5 - Consuming Female Performers (from the 1850s to the 1950s) - 2015 - 2
N°6 - Shakespeare en scène, hier et aujourd'hui - 2016 - 1
N°7 - Le Suicide au théâtre - 2016 - 2
N°8 - Danse et morale, une approche généalogique/Dance and Morality : a diachronic historical approach 2017-1
[HS 1] - Déjouer l'injouable : la scène contemporaine à l'épreuve de l'impossible 2017
N°9 - Écrire pour la scène : auteurs de théâtre (XVe-XVIIIe siècles) 2017-2

Sabine Chaouche
05/21/2017

Canular n°20 - 2 - Pièces de Sophocle

Niveau moyen

Retrouvez les véritables titres des pièces de Sophocle. Attention aux pièges tendus par notre farceur de service !

Tampax
Anti-gnôme
Les Trolls qui viennent
Vieux type roi
Les Spectres
File l'octet
Le Zip à colonnes
Les Piliers


Réponses ci-dessous. Answers below.

Canular n°20 - 2 - Pièces de Sophocle
Ajax
Antigone
Les Trachiniennes
Oedipe roi
Electre
Philoctète
Oedipe à Colone
Les Limiers

Sabine Chaouche
04/27/2017

Canular n°22 - 2 - Pièces d'Aristophane

Niveau : moyen

Retrouvez les véritables titres des pièces d'Aristophane. Attention aux pièges tendus par notre farceur de service !

Les Acharnés
Les Caves alliées
Les Buées
Les Guêpières
Les Oies d'eau
Les Thermo-souris
L'Aigre Nouille



Réponses ci-desous! Answers below!

Canular n°22 - 2 - Pièces d'Aristophane
Les Acharniens
Les Cavaliers
Les Nuées
Les Guêpes
Les Oiseaux
Les Thesmophories
Les Grenouilles

Sabine Chaouche
05/09/2017

Gallery
Thursday, November 22nd 2012
Read 1785 times

Impressionism and Fashion at the Musée d'Orsay




The exhibition has been organised by the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The Art Institute of Chicago.
It has been produced in Paris with the special participation of the Musée Galliera – Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris.

Level 0,
main exhibition area
25 September 2012 – 20 January 2013


Presentation by the Museum

Édouard Manet (1832-1883) Jeune dame en 1866, dite aussi la femme au perroquet [Young Lady in 1866, also called Woman with a Parrot] 1866, oil on canvas, 185.1 x 128.6 cm New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, © The  Metropolitan Museum of Art, Dist. RMN / image of the MMA
Édouard Manet (1832-1883) Jeune dame en 1866, dite aussi la femme au perroquet [Young Lady in 1866, also called Woman with a Parrot] 1866, oil on canvas, 185.1 x 128.6 cm New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Dist. RMN / image of the MMA
Although the Impressionists continued to capture on canvas the constantly changing natural world, their revolutionary contribution was not limited to painting landscapes. Their sharp observation also made them sensitive to urban change and the behaviour of city dwellers. In their desire to depict contemporary life, the Impressionists often chose to represent the human figure in an everyday setting, to capture the “modern man going about his business or in moments of leisure.

Manet and Degas were perfect examples of this new Parisian, the “flâneur”, the sophisticated, nonchalant observer of “modern life” and its daily cast of characters. Although they were not interested in scrupulous representation of physiognomy, costume and dress, the Impressionists nevertheless recorded the fashions and attitudes of their time through their desire to present the portrait as a snapshot of the subject in familiar surroundings, through their ability to revitalise both the typology and topography of the genre scene, and above all by focusing on “the daily metamorphosis of exterior things" to quote Baudelaire.

In Impressionist painting, figures and clothing lose, to take Mallarmé’s observation about Manet, “a little of their substance and their solidity”, or, in the words of the Goncourt brothers, they “are transfigured by the magic of light and shade”. The figure, whether moving or at rest, became more integrated into the surrounding atmosphere. The descriptive reality of the man and woman in the 1860-1880s and of their daily appearance underwent an undeniable metamorphosis because of these aesthetic approaches. On the other hand, thanks to the swiftness of execution, the gestures and play of fabric against the body became more authentic. Thus, we learn much more about the look during this period than we would from the posed society portrait or the artificially natural genre scene.

This observation is based on some sixty masterpieces by Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas and Caillebotte. Some of them have not been shown in Paris for many years, for example Renoir’s portrait of Madame Charpentier et ses enfants [Madame Charpentier and her Children] (New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art), Manet’s Nana (Hamburg, Hamburger Kunsthalle) exhibited at the Manet retrospective in 1983 (Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais), and The Theatre Box by Renoir from the Courtauld Institute in London.

For a better understanding of the Impressionists’ approach, their works will be displayed alongside those of their contemporaries - Tissot and Stevens for example – who concentrated even more on portraying Parisian women and the elegant society of the Second Empire and the early days of the Third Republic. But comparing these images with the real thing is much more instructive. And for this, a display of around fifty dresses and accessories, including ten hats, presents an overview of women’s fashion at the time of the Impressionists, a fashion that was mainly characterised by the gradual abandonment of the crinoline in favour of the bustle. Men’s fashion, less varied and more uniform, is evoked through some twenty pieces. All these examples of textiles come from public or private collections in France. And finally, an important documentary display brings together designs, fashion plates, fashion magazines, including La dernière Mode, a short-lived review edited by Mallarmé, and photographs from the Disdéri studio.

General curators: Gloria Groom, curator, Art Institute, Chicago
Guy Cogeval, director, Musée d'Orsay and Musée de l'Orangerie, Paris
Philippe Thiébaut, general curator, Musée d'Orsay, Paris
Susan Stein, curator, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Scenography: Robert Carsen, scenographer and artistic director
Nathalie Crinière, Agence NC, architect-exhibition designer


Other venues: 26 February - 27 May 2013, New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art
26 June - 22 September 2013, Chicago, The Art Institute

This exhibition was produced with the support of LVMH / Moët Hennessy. Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior
Media partners: Arte, France Inter, LCI, Le Parisien, Le Point, Stylia

Musée d'Orsay (c) Sophie Boegly
Musée d'Orsay (c) Sophie Boegly

James Tissot (dit), Jacques Joseph (1836 – 1905) Portrait du marquis et de la marquise de Miramon et de leurs enfants, 1865  Huile sur toile, 177 x 217 cm  Paris, Musée d’Orsay  © RMN (Musée d’Orsay) / Hervé Lewandowski
James Tissot (dit), Jacques Joseph (1836 – 1905) Portrait du marquis et de la marquise de Miramon et de leurs enfants, 1865 Huile sur toile, 177 x 217 cm Paris, Musée d’Orsay © RMN (Musée d’Orsay) / Hervé Lewandowski

Sabine Chaouche

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